Ways to Fight Daydreaming

August 9, 2012

Picture with me a beautiful house by the sea.  A guy suddenly comes across the balcony with a bouquet of flowers in his hands. He strides purposefully towards a girl standing in the corner and kneels down with one hand in his pocket and his other hand giving the bouquet of roses to her.  Alas, he holds up a glittering ring and utters the famous but much-waited phrase, “Will you marry me?”.

Let’s cut the story that way!  Isn’t it amazing?  Whether about love, career, or your family, I’m sure all of you have indulged in a similar feel-good daydream at least once.

Daydreams Can Turn Into Nighmares

But did you know that daydreaming all the time can be bad for you? It seems harmless enough, but not when you’re in a meeting with your boss and he’s giving instructions for an important project. And certainly not when you’re driving along EDSA and your mind wanders off into a daydream. In an instant, your daydreams can turn into a living nightmare.

Indeed, I was once a victim of uncontrolled daydreaming. Back-tracking on the times that I daydream, I realized that it’s usually when I wake up in the morning and is too lazy to get out of bed. I hit the snooze button on my alarm clock and daydream for 5, 10, and even 20 minutes! I also often daydream when I’m commuting alone, stuck in traffic, or reading a book in the library. I remember struggling with daydreaming and thinking of ways to control it so I can be more productive.

How to Snap Out of Habitual Daydreaming

It may be easy to control for some people, but there are others who become habitual daydreamers. However, do not lose hope! Because no matter how hard it may seem, there is always a way out if you are determined to change. For example, if you’re like me who always tries to get more sleep in the morning, maybe you should sleep early so you’ll be up and about the moment your alarm clock rings. Moreover, before you sleep, try to list down the things that you need to accomplish the next day, so when you wake up the next morning you will have a clear direction to be productive.

If your tendency is to daydream while travelling to work or school, consider bringing a book with you or praying for your loved ones. In this way, you keep your mind occupied and become more productive. If you’re alone in the library reading boring academic books and letting your mind fly to a fantasy place, why not intentionally read the topics you tackled or will tackle in your class. Also, while on vacation, try to socialize and bond with family and friends instead of daydreaming alone. Lastly, be conscious of what you are doing — idle minds are certainly more prone to daydreaming.

Turn Your Daydreams Into Reality

My mentor told me that whenever I want to give in to daydreams, I should pray or recall a phrase from the Bible in order to regain my will –   “Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable – if anything is excellent or praiseworthy – think about such things.” (Philippians 4:8) We should strive to create value for others and be productive in all that we think or do.